Programme no. 442-OP
Public Health
Growth patterns in children aged 0-5 years in a cohort of multi-ethnic preschool children: identifying children at risk of developing overweight and obesity.
Ingun Toftemo*1, Per Lagerløv2, Anne Karen Jenum3, Line Sletner4
1Department of General Practice,Institute of Health and Society, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway,Oslo,Norway, 2Department of General Practice,Institute of Health and Society, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway,Oslo,Norway, 3Department of General Practice,Institute of Health and Society, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway,Oslo,Norway, 4Pediatric Department,Akershus University Hospital,Lørenskog,Norway
* = Presenting author
Objectives: To present an ongoing study in primary care on growth patterns of preschool children in a multi-ethnic community, and preliminary data on prevalence of overweight and obesity stratified by ethnicity and adjusted for other factors.
Background: Prevalence of childhood overweight and obesity has increased in many countries over the last decades. Research shows associations between growth patterns in utero, during infancy, early childhood, and adult obesity and metabolic diseases. Several ethnic minority groups are more affected by obesity, cardiovascular diseases and type 2 diabetes than the general population.
Results: Primary outcome is data on prevalence of overweight and obesity at the pre-school visit at 4-5 years of age. In Gothenburg June 2015 we will present preliminary data for the largest ethnic groups and adjust for parents’ socioeconomic position.

Later we plan to explore the importance of exposure data from early life (duration of pregnancy, anthropometric data, breast feeding, vitamin D supplements), and parental exposure variables (household structure, parental body mass index , maternal integration level, dietary- and physical activity patterns, gestational diabetes, depression score, and smoking).

Material/Methods: Design: Observational study based on a cohort of pregnant mothers, fathers and their offspring. Study population: 823 pregnant women were during 2008-2010 included in the STORK-G study, a population based cohort study in Groruddalen, Oslo. 59 % had ethnic minority background. We have broad range of data on mothers and fathers. Growth data is available for 786 children from 3 ultrasound measurements during pregnancy and anthropometric data at birth. We are now collecting anthropometric data at children’s local Child Health Clinics where they were routinely measured at the age of 6 weeks, at 3, 6, 12, and 15 months, and at 2 and 4-5 years. So far, we have data on 526 children up to the age of 2 years. We expect to collect data on approximately 600 children by the age of 4 years.
Conclusion: Not ready yet
Points for discussion: Prevention of childhood overweight and obesity. Ethnic differences in health