Programme no. 436-OP
Public Health
Yoga’s impact on blood pressure, quality of life and on stress, depression and anxiety - A randomized controlled trial in primary health care
Moa Wolff*1, Björn Erdal2, Kristina Sundquist3, Patrik Midlöv4
1Lunds Universitet,Institutionen för kliniska vetenskaper, Avd. för allmänmedicin, Malmö,Malmö,Sweden, 2Lunds Universitet,Institutionen för kliniska vetenskaper, Avd. för allmänmedicin, Malmö,Malmö,Sweden, 3Lunds Universitet,Institutionen för kliniska vetenskaper, Avd. för allmänmedicin, Malmö,Malmö,Sweden, 4Lunds Universitet,Institutionen för kliniska vetenskaper, Avd. för allmänmedicin, Malmö,Malmö,Sweden
* = Presenting author
Objectives: This study aims to evaluate yoga’s impact on blood pressure and on stress, depression and anxiety in primary health care patients with hypertension.
Background: The YHIP study, which examined yoga as a treatment for primary care patients with hypertension, showed that a short home-based program of yoga had a blood pressure-lowering effect and a positive effect on self-rated quality of life. In view of this, we wanted to make a new and larger randomized study to confirm/further evalutate the effect of yoga on blood pressure. We also wanted to examine if the change in quality of life is related to stress, depression and anxiety.
Results: Of the 1020 patients invited, 326 chose to participate and 312 turned up at the baseline assessment. Of these, 123 patients (39%) did not meet the inclusion criteria regarding blood pressure. The remaining participants (n=189) were randomized to either yoga (n=94) or control group (n=95).
Material/Methods: Adult hypertensive patients (30-80 years) from three primary health care centers in southern Sweden, whose blood pressure when most recently checked at their primary health care center was 130-160/85-100 mmHg, were invited to participate in the study. The baseline assessment took place at the patient’s regular health care center. Blood pressure was measured in a standardized way, in a sitting position after 5-10 minutes of rest with validated electronic blood pressure devices. The patients also completed questionnaires on self-rated quality of life (WHOQOL-BREF), stress (PSS) and depression/anxiety (HADS). After the baseline assessment, the patients were randomized to either yoga or control group.

The patients randomized to yoga received, during a single 30 minutes GP consultation, information and instructions concerning two yoga exercises to perform 15 minutes two times per day during the intervention period. They also received a CD and a manual to facilitate their home exercises and a yoga diary in which to record details of when they had done yoga training. No changes were made for the control group, which received “treatment as usual.”

All patients were asked not to change their medication during the study.

After 12 weeks of intervention, all participants were reassessed for BP and questionnaires.

Conclusion: Data from the study are currently being analyzed.
Points for discussion: