Programme no. 427-OP
Professional Development
Pelvic examination in general practice. A survey from Western Norway
Stefan Hjørleifsson*1, Yngvild Hannestad2, Eivind Meland3, Guri Rørtveit4, Gunnar Tschudi Bondevik5
1Research Group for General Practice,University of Bergen,Bergen,Norway, 2Research Group for General Practice,University of Bergen,Bergen,Norway, 3Research Group for General Practice,University of Bergen,Bergen,Norway, 4Research Unit for General Practice,Uni Research Health,Bergen,Norway, 5Research Group for General Practice,University of Bergen,Bergen,Norway
* = Presenting author
Objectives: Objectives. This study was conducted to investigate:
Background: Little is known about how and when pelvic examination (PE) is done in general practice, including frequency of PE, indications for PE, and how it is performed technically. Norway has a registered list system with general practitioners (GPs) as gate keepers to secondary care.
Results: The data will be analyzed after completed data collection in March 2015. The results will be presented at the conference.
Material/Methods: The study is conducted as a limited survey of GPs in Western Norway. Final year medical students at the University of Bergen have 4 weeks workplace practice in primary care. In the period of January-March 2015, 70 medical students will distribute a questionnaire regarding PE to all GPs (n=200-250) in the practices. The data will be analyzed with standard statistical methods. The study has been placed before the Medical Ethics Board.
Conclusion: The study will investigate variability in how and on which indication GPs perform PE.
Points for discussion: What could be possible reasons for not doing a PE in general practice although the procedure is medically indicated?

How common is referral to gynecologist on women’s request without medical indication?