Programme no. 401-WS
Professional Development
Benefits and harms of general health checks - lifelong learning in general practice: how to read and use scientific literature
Ole Olsen*1, Helena Liira2, Jakob F Rasmussen3, Mads Toft Kristensen4, Anna Bebe5, Tora Willadsen6, Rasmus K Rasmussen7, Thomas Bo Drivsholm8, Christian Hermann9, John Brodersen10, Atle Klovning11, Klaus Witt12, Signe Flottorp13, Bruno Heleno14, Mie Hestbech15
1Research Unit for General Practice and Section of General Practice, Department of Public Health,University of Copenhagen,Copenhagen,Denmark, 2School of Primary, Rural and Aboriginal Health Care,University of Western Australia,Perth,Australia, 3Research Unit for General Practice and Section of General Practice, Department of Public Health,University of Copenhagen,Copenhagen,Denmark, 4Research Unit for General Practice and Section of General Practice, Department of Public Health,University of Copenhagen,Copenhagen,Denmark, 5Research Unit for General Practice and Section of General Practice, Department of Public Health,University of Copenhagen,Copenhagen,Denmark, 6Research Unit for General Practice and Section of General Practice, Department of Public Health,University of Copenhagen,Copenhagen,Denmark, 7Research Unit for General Practice and Section of General Practice, Department of Public Health,University of Copenhagen,Copenhagen,Denmark, 8Research Unit for General Practice and Section of General Practice, Department of Public Health,University of Copenhagen,Copenhagen,Denmark, 9Research Unit for General Practice and Section of General Practice, Department of Public Health,University of Copenhagen,Copenhagen,Denmark, 10Research Unit for General Practice and Section of General Practice, Department of Public Health,University of Copenhagen,Copenhagen,Denmark, 11Research Unit for General Practice and Department of General Practice, Institute of Health and Society,University of Oslo,Oslo,Norway, 12Research Unit for General Practice and Section of General Practice, Department of Public Health,University of Copenhagen,Copenhagen,Denmark, 13Prevention, health promotion and organisation unit,Norwegian Knowledge Centre for the Health Services,Oslo,Norway, 14Research Unit for General Practice and Section of General Practice, Department of Public Health,University of Copenhagen,Copenhagen,Denmark, 15Research Unit for General Practice and Section of General Practice, Department of Public Health,University of Copenhagen,Copenhagen,Denmark
* = Presenting author
Workshop
Objectives: After this workshop the participants will know the basics of how to read a systematic literature review, interpret a meta-analysis and be able to:

Clinical implication:

What are the benefits and harms of general health checks? This workshop will invite participants to read and critically appraise the corresponding Cochrane review.

Background: GPs often experience difficulties in keeping up-to-date, and at times feel they reach the outer boundaries of their knowledge. Evidence based medicine combines the best current research, clinical expertise, and combines the patient’s needs and preferences. To achieve this, the busy physician must find, assess, and implement scientific evidence about diagnosis and treatment. By learning and practising the principles of evidence-based medicine, GPs will have a tool to assist life-long learning in practice. This is best achieved by using questions that arise in GPs’ daily practice: learn by doing.
Content: The workshop is mostly based on small group activities with eight participants and two tutors in each group. The participants will be sent two scientific papers: the BMJ-version of the Cochrane review about general health checks and a paper about how to read a systematic review. Participants will also be provided with a check list to guide critical appraisal of the paper. Participants will be expected to have read 2 papers in advance before the workshop begins.
Method: • Lecture: Welcome and how to work in small groups – 15 minutes (plenary room)

• Small groups: critical assessment of the empirical paper – 60 minutes (smaller rooms)

• Plenary: Summary and final discussion – 15 minutes (plenary room)

Other considerations: