Programme no. 152-P
Quality Improvement
An electronic pregnancy health record – first step in establishment of a Danish birth cohort in general practice
Ruth Ertmann*1, John Sahl2, Janus Laust Thomsen3, Maja Poulsen4, Berit Lassen5, Kirsten Lykke6, Anette Graungaard7, Jacob Kragstrup8, Lars Bjerrum9, Anne-Marie Nybo Andersen10, Susanne Reventlow11
1The Research Unit for General Practice,CSS,Copenhagen ,Denmark, 2Department for General Practice,CSS,Copenhagen ,Denmark, 3DAK-E,J.B. Winsløws Vej 9A,Odense ,Denmark, 4DAK-E,J.B. Winsløws Vej 9A,Odense ,Denmark, 5DAK-E,J.B. Winsløws Vej 9A,Odense ,Denmark, 6The Research Unit for General Practice,CSS,Copenhagen ,Denmark, 7The Research Unit for General Practice,CSS,Copenhagen ,Denmark, 8The Research Unit for General Practice,CSS,Copenhagen ,Denmark, 9Department for General Practice,CSS,Copenhagen ,Denmark, 10Section of Social Medicine,CSS,Copenhagen ,Denmark, 11The Research Unit for General Practice,CSS,Copenhagen ,Denmark
* = Presenting author
Objectives: To improve the quality of pregnancy examinations during systematic registration by an interactive electronic pregnancy health record.

To establish a birth cohort in general practice

Background: The GP plays a central role in pregnancy care and examines the woman when she is 6-10, 25 and 32 weeks of gestation, as well as 8 weeks postpartum. The focus of these examinations is mainly on spotting complications and high-risk pregnancies. The content of the examinations is described by the National Board of Health. It is not known whether the description is followed. The GP makes notes in the patient file, but this is rarely done systematically and research into the quality of the data is not possible. There is a need for a tool to secure the quality of the examinations and information exchange between the pregnant women, the GP and the midwife. This information would also be useful for research purposes.
Results: The pregnant woman fills in parts of the pregnancy health record at home before her consultation. In addition, she can note topics she wants to discuss with the doctor.

The data capture system picks up laboratory data and medication.

The record is designed to send data forward and back from the GP’s health record to the midwife’s health record, and to the pregnant women.

For research purposes it would be possible to store all the answers in the pregnancy health record (not possible in a paper version) in a database, which would allow the creation of a cohort of pregnant women in Denmark. Additional information can be gathered through pop-up questionnaires on the GP’s computer screen e.g. lifestyle/mental health/over-the-counter medicine and the outcome of pregnancy.

Material/Methods: The project group has designed the electronic pregnancy health record as a quality development project for the GP. Later, when the electronic pregnancy health record is implemented, it will form the basis of data in a national birth cohort.
Conclusion: The electronic pregnancy health record has the potential to improve clinical practice and at the same time provide high quality data for new research into pregnancy.

The electronic pregnancy health record offers the pregnant women to have access to a full and updated version of her pregnancy health record and has the potential to improve communications with other parts of the healthcare system.

Points for discussion: What could be suggestions for research questions regarding health in pregnancy?

Can we get the pregnant women to fill in parts of her pregnancy record at home?